Vienna Retains Its Crown as World's Most Liveable City in 2023

Vienna Retains Its Crown as World’s Most Liveable City in 2023

UTC by Chimamanda U. Martha · 3 min read
Vienna Retains Its Crown as World’s Most Liveable City in 2023
Photo: Depositphotos

The 2023 Liveability Index was measured using different metrics such as stability, healthcare, education, culture, environment, and infrastructure.

The Austrian capital, Vienna, emerged again as the world’s most liveable city in 2023. With its captivating blend of rich culture, unparalleled infrastructure, and exceptional quality of life, Vienna has maintained this position for two consecutive years, solidifying its place as a true urban gem.

Vienna Is the Most Liveable City

The Austrian capital previously held this title in 2018 and 2019, respectively. However, in 2021, the city lost its prestigious crown to New Zealand’s Auckland following the pandemic, which resulted in shutting down its famous museums and restaurants.

In 2022, Vienna rebounded, reclaiming its title from Auckland as the world’s most liveable city of the year. The Austrian capital has once again, under the leadership of Michael Ludwig, topped the list in 2023.

According to a new survey conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), Vienna bested other cities in terms of infrastructure, quality education, and healthcare services, bringing it to the forefront of the Global Liveability Index.

“Vienna (Austria) tops the rankings for 2023, owing to its winning combination of stability, good culture and entertainment, reliable infrastructure, and exemplary education and health services. It has occupied this position regularly over the past several years, with only the covid-19 pandemic causing the city to vacate its place at the top spot,” reads the EIU report.

Melbourne and Sydney Make Strong Comeback in Global City Rankings

In this year’s ranking, the Northern European city Copenhagen secured the second position as the world’s most livable city, closely following Vienna on the list. The Denmark capital has retained this position for two years.

Australian cities Melbourne and Sydney were not left behind. The two towns witnessed a notable rebound, claiming the third and fourth spots on the list after experiencing a significant decline last year. Melbourne and Sydney stole the positions from western European cities Frankfurt and Amsterdam, which took the third and fourth positions in 2022.

The report attributed their success to improvements in healthcare services since last year when the cities were still suffering from the post-pandemic crisis.

Additionally, three cities in Canada, Vancouver, Calgary, and Toronto, took the 5th, 7th, and 9th positions on the list. Further down the list are two cities in Switzerland, Zurich, and Geneva, taking the 6th and 7th place, respectively.

The last on the list is the Japanese city of Osaka, which took tenth place in the world’s most liveable places. These cities emerged as the top ten most liveable cities in the world.

Embracing a Renewed Sense of Liveability Post-Pandemic

The 2023 Liveability Index was measured using different metrics such as stability, healthcare, education, culture, environment, and infrastructure. According to the report, the Liveability Index reached its highest level in 15 years, reflecting the world’s progress beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

The survey highlighted notable improvements in healthcare and education scores across numerous cities in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. However, the report also reveals a decline in stability scores compared to the previous year, attributed to global civil unrest.

Upasana Dutt, head of the liveability index at EIU, said that the shift towards normalcy after the pandemic has significantly improved the 2023 global liveability index. Adding that education has emerged stronger among children.

“Education has emerged stronger with children returning to schools, alongside a significantly reduced burden on hospitals and healthcare systems, with some notable improvements in cities across developing economies of Asia and the Middle East,” he said.

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