Craig Wright Wins Approval to Serve Copyright Lawsuit against Bitcoin.org

UTC by John K. Kumi · 3 min read
Craig Wright Wins Approval to Serve Copyright Lawsuit against Bitcoin.org
Photo: Shutterstock

Wright claims he has no intention to bully smaller websites, neither does he plan on limiting access to the whitepaper, but he wants to prevent developers and creators of similar assets like the Bitcoin Core to deceive the public that their asset is Bitcoin

Craig Wright, an Australian scientist, has won a minor procedural legal approval to serve Bitcoin.org A.K.A Cobra with a copyright lawsuit on the publication of the Bitcoin whitepaper. Craig Wright has long claimed to be the developer of Bitcoin, Satoshi Nakamoto, though the earlier documents released to support his claim were massively disputed.

Bitcoin.org, according to the court, has not revealed its name, address, or identity. For this reason, Wright has the legal right to serve the lawsuit through Twitter or a generic email. It is important to understand that this approval does not in any way validate Craig Wright as Satoshi Nakamoto which is the underlying purpose for this lawsuit. 

There have been many reports that the creator of Bitcoin popularly known as Satoshi Nakamoto is completely anonymous. For this reason, many entities have freely used important documents supporting the creation of the asset including the Bitcoin whitepaper without any copyright issues. That was until Craig Wright came into the scene. He claims that he is the Satoshi Nakamoto, so no entity has the legal right to host the white paper. 

As part of the move, Wright, through his lawyer Simon Cohen sent a cease-and-desist letter to Bitcoin.org to take down the whitepaper and accused them of wrongfully operating the site. 

Bitcoin.org in response rejected the order over the claim that Wright has not been able to prove that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. Bitcoin.org in a reply clarified their stand stating that if Wright is the owner of Bitcoin, then he would be the 25th richest man on earth. 

“Seems like he’s trying to abuse the UK courts to make them try to censor the white paper and harass small websites like us providing education content with his behavior,” said Cobra.

Wright in response claims he has no intention to bully smaller websites, neither does he plan on limiting access to the whitepaper, but he wants to prevent developers and creators of similar assets like the Bitcoin Core to deceive the public that their asset is Bitcoin when they do not even share the same vision as laid out in the whitepaper.

Another report claims that Bicoin.org initially removed the whitepaper after weighing the cost involved in the legal battle. However, several companies including Square Crypto and Novi, a subsidiary of Facebook’s Stablecoin hosted the whitepaper in solidarity. Square received its fair share of the cease-and-desist letter, however, the Cryptocurrency Open Patent Alliance (COPA) founded in September 2020 filed a lawsuit against Wright over the Bitcoin whitepaper copyright claims. 

In 2016, after Wright had made a series of claims that he is Satoshi Nakamoto, he supported his claims with proofs that were said to have a lot of loopholes. He assured to provide more documents to support his claim, but later apologized and said he did not have the courage to do that. 

Bitcoin News, Cryptocurrency news, News
John K. Kumi
Author John K. Kumi

Excellent John K. Kumi is a cryptocurrency and fintech enthusiast, operations manager of a fintech platform, writer, researcher, and a huge fan of creative writing. With an Economics background, he finds much interest in the invisible factors that causes price change in anything measured with valuation. He has been in the crypto/blockchain space in the last five (5) years. He mostly watches football highlights and movies in his free time.

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